What is the the 10/40 Window?

A number of our missionaries serve in what is known as the “10/40 window.” Exactly what is the 10/40 Window? Why is it important? Where can I find out more information about the 10/40 Window?

The Joshua Project, a leading missions organization that serves to mobilize the Church to reach unreached people groups (those cultural/linguistic groups with little or no access to the Gospel at present) defines the 10?40 Window the following way:

The 10/40 Window is the rectangular area of North Africa, the Middle East and Asia approximately between 10 degrees north and 40 degrees north latitude. The 10/40 Window is often called "The Resistant Belt" and includes the majority of the world's Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists. The original 10/40 Window included only countries with at least 50% of their land mass within 10 and 40 degrees north latitude. The revised 10/40 Window includes several additional countries, such as Indonesia, that are close to 10 or 40 degrees north latitude and have high concentrations of unreached peoples. See the original and revised country lists to the right. An estimated 4.54 billion individuals residing in approximately 8,687 distinct people groups are in the revised 10/40 Window. The 10/40 Window is home to some of the largest unreached people groups in the world such as the Shaikh, Yadava, Turks, Moroccan Arabs, Pushtun, Jat and Burmese.

The 10/40 Window has several important considerations: first, the historical and Biblical significance; second, the least evangelized countries; third, the unreached people groups and cities; fourth, the dominance of three religious blocs; fifth, the preponderance of the poor; sixth, the strongholds of Satan within the 10/40 Window.

Here is a basic map of the 10/40 window:




To learn more about the 10/40 Window, you may [click here to visit the Joshua Project] website.

To learn more about the various missionaries that BRCC supports who are working within the 10/40 Window, click the link to the left of the page.

November 2016
August 2008